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COVID-19 Protestors in France Opposes the Implementation of a Health Pass, Conspiracy Theories to Blame




(Photo : Unsplash/ Patrick Perkins) covid-19 protest

COVID-19 conspiracy theories have reached millions of people worldwide. It has caused debates on whether the government is being reasonable with requiring vaccination and health passes to travel and visit public spaces.

The latest example of the effects of COVID-19 conspiracy theories is the rally in France on July 17 that more than 100,000 people attended.

The French protested President Emmanuel Macron’s plans of requiring a health pass to access public places like cinemas, restaurants, and cafes.

COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories Effects

Conspiracy theories have fueled the opposition to making proof of COVID-19 vaccination mandatory, aside from the concerns about civil liberties.

The French government announced that beginning July 21, a health pass will be needed for people to access leisure and cultural venues.

From the beginning of August, the health pass will be required on long-distance public transport, outdoor terraces, and shopping centers as well.

Also Read: Truth About 5G Coronavirus Conspiracy Theory: Here’s What Experts Say

The health pass must include the QR code that proves a person has been fully vaccinated, or it must include results from a negative antigen test taken in the last two days.

France’s COVID-19 cases have rebounded as the Delta variant has spread in the country, with the average number of new cases per day soaring almost 11,000 from the recorded 2,000 cases per day in June.

The rise in cases prompted President Macron to announce the health pass restrictions.

However, the move was welcomed by the opposition. Around 137 rallies took place in the country on July 17, gathering 114,000 demonstrators.

Many believe that obligating people to be…

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